A climate deal in Germany is at risk from a brewing oil blockade

The government of Canada has proclaimed itself “one of the biggest marketplaces in the world” on the eve of an international summit on the environment. What it means by this is unclear; the work…

A climate deal in Germany is at risk from a brewing oil blockade

The government of Canada has proclaimed itself “one of the biggest marketplaces in the world” on the eve of an international summit on the environment. What it means by this is unclear; the work of international climate negotiations has shown that governments often roll out the red carpet for international commerce while in their own capitals actively stalling the application of new rules that affect the success of their economic output.

Most Canadian activists want to see what we should already know: that Canada’s national economy is tied to fossil fuels. It makes sense, given that the goods and services on which we rely — health care, food, education — are, like carbon emissions, finite and require long-term planning.

At COP23 in Bonn, last November, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised that his government would “commit $1 billion in new funding to help provinces and territories on issues related to combating climate change.” This money is coming, but it comes at the extremely unfortunate time that Canada must send tens of thousands of troops on a seven-week combat mission into the unknown in the Middle East.

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