Chicago’s $5,000 Drain on the Navy

An unexpected investigation has cost Chicagoans over $5,000. This week, the Navy hosted a luncheon to commemorate its 70th anniversary and Vice Admiral Vincent Dolce of the USS Dallas (AEC-15) met with fellow admirals…

Chicago's $5,000 Drain on the Navy

An unexpected investigation has cost Chicagoans over $5,000.

This week, the Navy hosted a luncheon to commemorate its 70th anniversary and Vice Admiral Vincent Dolce of the USS Dallas (AEC-15) met with fellow admirals and guests, including Chicagoans, over at Dockside 360.

The luncheon took place on board the Texas, named in honor of the hometown of Chicago’s Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Shortly before the event began, Dockside 360 shared on Facebook that they could not provide public restrooms on board the aircraft carrier due to “unforeseen circumstances.”

The city of Chicago changed its plans, as it is tradition to gift the Navy with tents for events. Thinking no one knew about the promotion, Dockside 360 asked: “We know it was posted the other day, but what has happened with the toilets on board the vessel?”

As the second responders, the Dockside360 crew turned to an unlikely source: Chicago’s ABC7 News. With 60-Second Reporter Sarah Nehm’s request, they’ve asked the Navy to provide passengers on board the aircraft carrier with toilets and kitchen appliances.

To me, the unknown potential of lavatories at the center of a hurricane evacuation in the middle of the night raises a few questions.

First, as a non-pilot, how would a passenger get from the DJ booth to the bathroom, if the bathroom was located in the cabins? Did every passenger ride in a different car? Would every pilot be able to unlock a latch or push a button?

Second, could the pilots communicate with passengers to verify bathroom usage? In that case, passengers would have to use a phone scanner. I know that because my middle school history teacher told me that.

Third, how do some people on this thing manage to break out a bathroom in a nightclub so they can pee or get some toilet paper. Oh wait, I forgot: that is what the bathrooms are for, right? In 2013, a couple of tourists tried to open a bathroom door on a bus in Virginia.

Okay, the bathroom probably wasn’t in the bunks in the middle of a hurricane, but could there be an occupant or occupant of an airplane forcing the bathroom from its primary function? Did anyone tell the passengers about the bathroom use in the back?

Finally, do you think that because of Chicago’s celebration of the Navy that the Navy will bring a manufacturer to town to build toilets for the city?

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