Dan Hess on “The Windmills of Your Mind” by Paul Auster

Guest commentator Dan Hess hosts the weekly podcast Who’s Been Reading: We start with “Force of the Night” by legendary poet Stephen Crane. As a Jew of privilege in New York in the early…

Guest commentator Dan Hess hosts the weekly podcast Who’s Been Reading:

We start with “Force of the Night” by legendary poet Stephen Crane.

As a Jew of privilege in New York in the early 19th century, Crane was aware of his Jewish heritage and the dangers it could pose. In his transcendental poem “Force of the Night,” Crane lay out how Judaism was and is both inseparable from the American experience and the enemy of it. Crane’s poem rises above the years of violence to examine what happens when religion becomes so fixed in our lives it becomes a force that can oppress. The way Crane portrays the person of the spirit may resonate with modern readers who see the glass as half empty (i.e. our political situation). You may want to read it now, with the current events in mind. “Force of the Night” offers hope, introspection, and a poem that really puts the matter in our own hands.

“The Windmills of Your Mind” by Paul Auster is a love story that follows a young man through manhood, love, travel, and an organic career. Things are rarely simple, and the story takes Paul down unexpected paths. Auster invites his readers to explore a time and place that is as fascinating as it is exotic. “The Windmills of Your Mind” is so diverse and unique in its ideas, locations, and people, we feel readers should be prepared to jump into this maze of a story to see how much they can experience.

So, we bring you everything you need to know about “The Windmills of Your Mind” here. This is a much different reading experience than the traditional psychological novel. Whether you’re a romance or language fan, you will find something to read, whether you’re looking for our original source, or a novel that borrows from the genre of the modern-day film “Oscar Wilde.”

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