New York City Public School Enrollment Declined 4.5 Percent During the Pandemic

New York City Public School Enrollment Declined 4.5 Percent During the Pandemic SEATTLE, NEB.: Avian Flu Pandemic, H5N1 Influenza Plague Pigs, Peas, Shrimp, and Humans all of America in 6 Years Seattle, Washington; December…

New York City Public School Enrollment Declined 4.5 Percent During the Pandemic

New York City Public School Enrollment Declined 4.5 Percent During the Pandemic

SEATTLE, NEB.: Avian Flu Pandemic, H5N1 Influenza Plague Pigs, Peas, Shrimp, and Humans all of America in 6 Years

Seattle, Washington; December 6, 2017– The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed the death of a boy in New York City from avian flu (H5N1) after contracting the highly pathogenic virus from a shared bathroom in a school building. The boy’s illness was the first transmission of the H5N1 virus to humans in the United States in almost two decades.

However, amidst this alarming news, we learn that the New York City Public School Enrollment declined by 4.5 percent during the pandemic period from 2004 to 2007.

The study, Data from the New York City Public School Enrollment Survey (NYCPSES), highlighted the decline in both college preparedness and teacher availability over the past decade in an effort to examine the effectiveness of having students who are familiar with tests, topics, and the like in classrooms.

Despite the great increase in school readiness, class size remained the same from 2004 to 2007. Specifically, over the course of the pandemic period, enrollment in public school decreased by 3.1 percent in kindergarten through 8th grade. In elementary school, the enrollment decline was 3.5 percent, as students moved to pre-kindergarten or to charter or private schools. Private school enrollment increased by 1.4 percent and charter school enrollment decreased by 5.6 percent.

H5N1 influenza has been circulating in Asia since 1997 and in humans since 2003. The H5N1 virus has caused a high prevalence of human infections worldwide and has resulted in about 260,000 human infections and 60,000 deaths. Earlier estimates for infections and deaths associated with the 2003-2004 outbreaks were lower than the data used in the study. The H5N1 flu virus remains highly transmissible to other birds and humans, and other diseases that are a human-bird risk are reported as having spread via influenza. Some of the diseases associated with the 2003-2004 influenza outbreak include Rift Valley Fever, Salmonella, Foot and Mouth Disease, H7N9, and Shigella.

Read the full study here: http://bit.ly/2jxKNDU

Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Visit KaiserHealthNews.org.

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SOURCE The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

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