Police plan 24-hour Halloween ‘lockdown’

By Elliot Wilson BBC News, London Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play. Advertisement Police say a new scheme could see revellers celebrating Halloween become a little bit safer. Millions of people…

Police plan 24-hour Halloween 'lockdown'

By Elliot Wilson

BBC News, London

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play. Advertisement Police say a new scheme could see revellers celebrating Halloween become a little bit safer. Millions of people will wear masks and costumes on 19 October, unleashing what can be a very terrifying experience for some. The Metropolitan Police is hoping the decision to give out 24-hour policing on the night will deter some criminals, and hopefully reduce night-time disorder. Joanna Payne-Cooper, Deputy Assistant Commissioner of Public Order, said the decision to carry out 24-hour policing would send out a powerful message. “There is no excuse to risk the safety of others,” she said. “People will hear that. The feeling that you have to be in costume or show some sort of expression to avoid this sort of treatment, particularly with younger people who are fully aware of what they can expect, can’t be underestimated.” The Met is encouraging its officers to be clear with any approaching revellers on the night. Community support There is also a drive in schools and community centres for young people to let their parents know about the scheme. Whether it is a mask or a costume, you shouldn’t be putting anyone in danger on Halloween

Joanna Payne-Cooper

Metropolitan Police She said if parents and young people felt the need to dress up for the night, they should ensure costumes are not dangerous, for example could be posed with sharp objects. “Whether it is a mask or a costume, you shouldn’t be putting anyone in danger on Halloween,” she said. In addition to 24-hour patrols, the Met said it would be using various cameras, including a HD vision equipped camera which can be mounted on four observation posts. But in an attempt to stop a repeat of last year’s Halloween night disorder, where images of terrified revellers were uploaded onto social networking sites, the Met are urging potential offenders to turn in photographs and any video of incidents which will help prosecute any perpetrators. Police say officers working during the Halloween night would be present to deal with any troublemakers, and would have the power to place detain and charge anyone who broke the law.

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