Suburban properties in New York City threaten high-rise tenants with eviction

On 21 August, Three vacant high-rise condos in New York City’s Central Park District were hit with notices from financier Glendale Capital Group LLC requesting that a number of occupants “may terminate their tenancy”…

Suburban properties in New York City threaten high-rise tenants with eviction

On 21 August, Three vacant high-rise condos in New York City’s Central Park District were hit with notices from financier Glendale Capital Group LLC requesting that a number of occupants “may terminate their tenancy” because the properties were not in “compliance with local building and fire codes.” Two were entitled, the notices states, to financial relief by refinance, which GCC says it will initiate. The notices, which threaten additional property tax increases, did not take into account the apartments’ central park views or “beneficial location,” although the notices complain that their owners “forgo[e] this advantage,” among other things.

This came after the Central Park District Board of Education, meeting in August, voted unanimously to stop renting space at the 132 Central Park Tower, 102 Central Park Tower, and 30 Central Park Tower “while further consideration is given to any community benefits that may be required” by the buildings’ owners. A spokesperson for RKP Development Corporation, whose former partners owned the buildings, complained that the district board had violated zoning law by not seeking its input and that it should not “interfere with an ongoing $1 billion reconstruction of Manhattan’s Central Park.”

The New York Times detailed the cost of demolishing several middle-class terraces and elevators and rerouting crosstown expressways over 80th Street so that construction could begin in July 2016. Construction was initially expected to take two years, but that was later reduced to one. This “was not the only problem” RKP president William Durst complained in court filings after he lost a legal challenge to the city’s regulations in January.

But back to those notices. They were apparently not received by those tenants along with 22 other high-rise units at 20 West 100th Street that were also threatened with closing, whose landlord couldn’t persuade local officials to waive public-access requirements or rerout expressways.

Other threatened properties are 187 Plaza and 223 Riverside Drive in the Bronx, 81 Queen Street, 53 First Avenue, 122 Park Avenue, 25 Park Avenue, 15 Mercer Street, and 14 East End Avenue.

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