Swim campers who wear protective gear against bacteria are less likely to catch infections

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that campers who participated in “stay-behind” swimming routines and “carbon monoxide sampling” kept infection-free during the 2017 summer camp season. COVID –…

Swim campers who wear protective gear against bacteria are less likely to catch infections

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that campers who participated in “stay-behind” swimming routines and “carbon monoxide sampling” kept infection-free during the 2017 summer camp season.

COVID – or Carefully Exercise-Protected Indoor Swim — emerged during the 90s as a way to promote water safety for children while minimizing bacteria build-up in a swim suit. By using “cuckoo clocks” or sprinklers to add CO to dry clothing, prevent exposure to up to 10 times the daily amount of CO emitted by candles, and encouraging swimmers to wear goggles in greater number, campers can often dramatically reduce the risk of contracting bacterial skin infections or opportunistic infections, including those caused by listeria and E. coli.

This, in turn, prevented infections from the bacteria that is primarily responsible for diarrhea and urinary tract infections, as well as nitrosamines (the toxic ingredient in cooking charcoal which is especially harmful to the gut) and chlorinated water which can be a risk factor for transmitting EV-D68, a bacteria which causes group B strep.

This trend has helped summer camps deal with an issue that most of us find troublesome: maintaining contamination-free living conditions in the sweltering summer months.

Read the full story at The Washington Post.

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