US study seeks protection against H5N1 vaccine: study

Covid-19 marks the most comprehensive and well-conducted surveillance of vaccines against a related but newly emerging virus H5N1. Developed by scientists at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, the study revealed that infants who…

US study seeks protection against H5N1 vaccine: study

Covid-19 marks the most comprehensive and well-conducted surveillance of vaccines against a related but newly emerging virus H5N1. Developed by scientists at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, the study revealed that infants who were vaccinated against inactivated H5N1, while infants in the country with good indoor air quality (US) were not vaccinated. According to the study presented to a press conference at the 82nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Society for Microbiology in Chicago this week, vaccination at three months delayed onset of disease in vaccinated infants compared to those in the US without good indoor air quality. Moreover, in infants aged six to twelve months infants were substantially less susceptible to respiratory syncytial virus, a sub-type of H5N1 viral disease than unexposed infants. Children and adolescents, aged two to 17 years, were 75% less likely to become infected with H5N1 if treated with zidovudine, a vaccine currently licensed for use. However, this outcome was observed only if serum was held for 48 hours. In infants born prematurely, non-vaccine use significantly predicted infection in 46% of cases. As previously reported from the same site, H5N1-related disease, after vaccination, is not associated with secondary infections. Vaccination also significantly reduced mortality from respiratory syncytial virus in the vaccinated infants, the study found. The institute’s study is the first large epidemiological study to examine the relationship between immunity and infectious disease related to pediatric H5N1. Due to susceptibility to influenza-like illnesses such as influenza and pneumonia, immunity to H5N1 would be a substantial benefit, the researchers note. Meanwhile, furthermore, they also found that women in their 30s and 40s gave good immune responses to H5N1 vaccines in case of non-dominant boys and young men without pre-existing antibodies to H5N1. Thus, if highly vulnerable groups (MDA) as well as vaccinated MDA were to be integrated into the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), the results would be more useful for vaccine development. Moreover, more research would be needed to identify other ways of protecting infants from the disease, including active immunization. Eventually, universal use of the vaccine might become possible for all children from ten months. The research was supported by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the US Military Health System (USMHS), and the AFTID, CDC, NIH, Canada Community Health, Canadian Vaccine Campaign, InterVax Foundation, the HHS National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the US National Center for Research Resources, NIH’s Fogarty International Center, the CDC, and several other entities, such as the HIV Vaccine Trials Network and multiple nonprofit groups. –Ends–

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