What is Anglican liturgy in 2018?

Prof Cherie Cornish, master of the Moot Court Liturgy: “Gratefulness is an important key to the way in which we pray. We want to acknowledge something that’s valuable and meaningful. We don’t want to…

What is Anglican liturgy in 2018?

Prof Cherie Cornish, master of the Moot Court Liturgy: “Gratefulness is an important key to the way in which we pray. We want to acknowledge something that’s valuable and meaningful. We don’t want to be grumpy. We want to be exuberant and joyful about things that are positive in our lives.”

Prof Margherita di Stasio, associate professor of liturgy: “What’s really exciting for us to think about is teaching through change. We’re a very hard-core liturgical community. I think being ‘left wing’, working for the poor, in this world, will only get harder as we look to redefine liturgy for an even wider and more inclusive audience.”

Oftentimes, academics find themselves in uncharted waters when it comes to liturgy. “I’m not a trained priest, I’m not a trained theologian,” says ecumenical theologian Daniel Mark, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Divinity School. “But I think all of us think liturgy has really become central to how we think about God, what we worship, how we think about relationships and how we think about human existence.”

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